Tag Archives: business advice for contractors

Why Contractors Fail

There has been significant research performed to determine why construction companies struggle financially, why they are dysfunctional and why some ultimately fail. The top 10 reasons (in no specific order) are basically business fundamentals and grouped as follows: Lack of a Clear Vision Casting and Defining Corporate Values / Goals and a Solid Market Value […]

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Basic Survival Questions for Today’s Challenging Construction Marketplace

 To survive and prosper in today’s marketplace it is imperative you, as the owner or top management, spend time evaluating your company and the marketplace. Below are some high level questions you might want to ponder. Do you have clearly defined goals for your company and a vision you can articulate to your employees and […]

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Survival or Success in The Construction Industry – The Choice is Yours

We have been, and are still, in one of the most challenging business environments any of us will ever experience as contractors, subcontractors or service providers. But the most fascinating fact is that many businesses are busier and more profitable than ever. What’s Up With That?? The answers might be simpler than you think. While […]

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What’s Love Got To Do With It?

Thinking back over the thousands of conversations and meeting I’ve been involved in during 2014, I continuously witness behavioral patterns that can only be described as “dysfunctional” and “dishonest.” I see it in all aspects of life, be it personal, corporate or community. I purposely did not include government in the list as it is […]

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It’s Not That Hard To Work Smart

Here’s the story.  In my very early thirties, I was blessed to be hired by a large, regional commercial GC to create and manage their Business Development and Marketing program, basically, from scratch. A couple of weeks into the gig, I attended one of their quarterly, day long, offsite divisional financial/operational meetings attended by more […]

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OSHA Electrical Standards ToolBox Talk – The Shocking Truth Revealed

Electricity is such a part of our everyday life we take it for granted and don’t treat it with the respect it deserves. Like the previous standards we have reviewed, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see and understand the hazards – Just common sense. We all know that electrical shocks can be extremely […]

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Applying Historical Principles to Grow Your Construction Company

In these tough economic times, we see construction companies surviving and growing and those failing or just fading away. Interestingly enough, the Bible reveals some time-tested principles that we should all heed and apply in our daily lives. As a Trusted Advisor to the industry, I have observed one interesting phenomenon regarding companies that fail.  […]

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Subcontractors and Site Safety

Generally speaking, prime contractors hire subcontractors to perform the majority of the scope of work. The subcontract agreements should outline specific performance requirements for the subcontractor in matters pertaining to safety. The question here is “Do you actually review, on an ongoing basis, the subcontractors compliance to those obligations”? When I ask this question to […]

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Personal Protective Equipment – What is the Employer’s Responsibility?

When most people think about construction sites and safety equipment for employees the first thing that probably pops in their mind is a hardhat. The international icon of the industry, but only one element of many that  contractors and subcontractors  must provide – at no cost – to their employees according to OSHA. Do you […]

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Falls–Unprotected Floor Openings

Unprotected floor openings are responsible for numerous serious and deadly accidents yearly. Planning and personal attention to detail can prevent these senseless for accidents. OSHA Standard 1926.500 mandates that any floor opening measuring 12 inches across or larger must be covered or protected by a standard guard rail with toeboard. The cover must be large […]

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